Following-Up on My 2018 Goals

Near the start of 2018, I wrote a blog post titled, “New Year, New Goals.” In that post, I listed my top four personal goals that I wanted to achieve for the year. This post is a follow-up to summarize how I did for the year. I’m not here to make excuses for why some goals weren’t met — I’m just being transparent about how I did with each of the goals I had set out to achieve at the beginning of 2018.

❌ Obtain My VCP-DCV 6.5

Welp, I definitely fell short on this one. I took a crack at this exam back in May, and for my first-ever attempt, I got a 290, however a minimum score of 300 is required to pass. I was so crushed, but knew I wasn’t going to let this get me down! I studied more, read more online documentation, and even took a series of Hands-on-Labs.

After VMWorld US had wrapped up, I gave it another shot in October. Again, I fell just short with a score of 285. I honestly don’t know how I did worse, but I did. My goal was to give it another shot before the end of the year, however I waited too long to schedule a time slot. By the time I felt ready to schedule, the remaining exam dates for December had filled up! So, it looks like I’ll have to give it another shot in 2019, and it looks like this goal will be on the list again for next year.

✅ Attend my first VMworld Conference

I was VERY fortunate and had the opportunity to attend my first-even VMworld conference in Las Vegas back in late August! Although my current company prefers to send one person from the team each year and rotate through, we’ll see if I’m able to make it to the conference in 2019. You can read all about my first VMworld experience in my earlier blog post, “My First VMworld Experience.”

❌ Publish at least 20 blog posts for the year

Including this post, I published 18 total blog posts for the year, and fell just short of my goal of 20. I felt like I was off to a good start in the spring, and again through #BlogTober, but once the holiday season fell upon us, I got distracted with other activities and simply missed the mark. No excuses; I clearly lost sight of this goal as the year went on. Let’s see if I can successfully achieve this goal in 2019.

✅ Obtain vExpert

I had initially applied for the vExpert program during the mid-2017 timeframe, however I didn’t quite make the initial cut. Although my application was rejected, I at least received some feedback as to why. One of the reasons was that my blog was literally brand new, and I didn’t have any posts dating back to the previous year.

After not making the initial cut, I was determined to try again in the next round. This event (as well as LOTS of encouragement from the #vCommunity) also nudged me to consider presenting at my local VMUG meeting as well as getting more involved, overall. As a result of these continued efforts, I truly believe it’s what led to me being accepted in next the round of vExpert program announcements earlier this year. Actually finding out that I was indeed accepted into the 2018 vExpert program was a bit of a funny story, and you can read all about that experience in my blog post titled, “Achievement Unlocked! VMware vExpert-2018.”

I want to wish each of you a happy, safe, and prosperous New Year in 2019! As always, thank you for stopping by!

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PowerCLI: Find VMs Based on Virtual Hardware Version

Hello again, everyone! For my fifth post for this year’s #BlogtoberTech challenge, I decided to share a script I recently wrote that seeks out virtual machines in a vSphere environment based on a specific virtual hardware version. This sort of ties in with the BIOS and UEFI scripts I wrote earlier in the year to seek out VMs that may still be open to the Spectre/Meltdown vulnerabilities (virtual hardware version 8 or older). Or perhaps someone wants to seek out VMs that may be good candidates to enable Secure Boot (virtual hardware 13 or newer with EFI boot firmware configured).

In the initial version of this script, I ask the user to pick the vCenter to connect to, the datacenter object to scan, and then the virtual hardware version to seek out. If VMs of virtual hardware are found, the user has the option of exporting the results to a CSV file. Otherwise, a dialog box will appear (via Out-GridView) that shows the results of the can. If, however, no VMs with a specified virtual hardware version are found, it will simply let the user know that “No VMs with virtual hardware were found.”

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find VMs Based on Virtual Hardware Version”

My Upcoming Central PA VMUG Presentation

Hey everyone! I wanted to spread the word about my upcoming presentation at the Central PA VMUG on Thursday, November 1st in State College! Last year, I spoke at the Pittsburgh VMUG on the topic of PowerCLI and my journey into scripting. This year, I plan on revisiting that presentation with several new updates and maybe even do live demo (assuming I can get my home lab completely set up and configured in time)! Plus, I’m looking forward to catching up with the Central PA VMUG crew as well as meeting many others in the #vCommunity!

For those who may not know, October 2017 was my first time ever presenting at a local VMUG meeting. In fact, I wasn’t really engaged in the VMware Community all that much until about April 2017, when I started my blog and began using Twitter a lot more. Sure, I’ve been using VMware’s products and services since about 2010, but the only real ‘engagement’ I’ve done in the community was attend the occasional VMUG or UserCon.

Continue reading “My Upcoming Central PA VMUG Presentation”

My New YouTube Channel is now Live!

Hey everyone! I wanted to take this opportunity to announce that my brand-new YouTube channel is now live! I’ve mentioned it over on Twitter, but I wanted to spread the word here on my blog, as well. Over the past several months, I’ve had this idea in my mind to start augmenting my written blog content with video content of some kind. My idea is that some people may prefer to read a post with text and screenshots, while others might prefer to watch a video and follow along.

In a previous life, I worked quite a bit with photography and video production, so why not merge that experience with the technology-related content I’ve been putting here on my blog? But, if I’m going to do this video content, I wanted to do it right with quality audio and video. After all, I do have some decent DSLR cameras and lenses that are perfectly capable of shooting video. So, I decided to stop stalling and take a crack at putting my first video together. However, I think the biggest challenge for me is that I’m used to being the one behind the camera, not the one in front of it!

Continue reading “My New YouTube Channel is now Live!”

PowerCLI: Find VMs with Any Independent Disks

I recently had a request come through to see if there was a way to quickly find any/all virtual machines with Independent Disks attached. In this particular scenario, I’ll be looking for these types of VMs within a specific datacenter object. However, this script could easily be changed to scan an entire vCenter object, if needed. This script will look for VMs with both independent persistent as well as independent non-persistent disks.

Like some of my other scripts, this one also utilizes the try/catch when first connecting to a vCenter Server. For instance, if you attempt to connect to a vCenter and enter the wrong credentials or wrong server name/IP, it will stop the script and state that it “Could not connect to the vCenter Server <name>. In addition, I also have some logic built in to track the progress of the scan, as well as the option to export the results to CSV if preferred.

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find VMs with Any Independent Disks”

PowerCLI: Quickly Look Up VM’s Boot Firmware Setting

A few months ago, I wrote two blog posts about how to find all UEFI- or BIOS-enabled virtual machines at the data center level within a vCenter Server. But what if you just want to quickly look up the boot firmware setting of a specific VM or even just a few of them?

I wrote this script as a way to quickly look up a small number of VMs to see if they might be good candidates for enabling Secure Boot or not. If you recall from those two posts, in order to enable Secure Boot, a VM needs to have virtual hardware version 13 or higher (meaning vSphere 6.5 or higher), and the VM boot firmware needs to be set to EFI.

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Quickly Look Up VM’s Boot Firmware Setting”

My First VMworld Experience

IMG_E6898I’ve been wanting to write about my first-ever VMworld experience even before the plane departed from McCarran airport, but I just couldn’t seem to find the time to actually sit down and “put my thoughts to paper” as they say. I can’t believe it’s already been a month since the conference events first kicked off in Las Vegas! The time sure does fly by! But, I at least wanted to share my experience with others who maybe haven’t been to a VMworld conference yet, or who might be going for the first time next year. (Hey, you never know!)

Continue reading “My First VMworld Experience”

PowerCLI: Find BIOS-Enabled VMs

This script is an idea that spun off of my previous post, PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs. If you’re preparing to enable Secure Boot in a VMware environment, it may be helpful to identify the VMs that cannot be upgraded. As you might recall, enabling secure boot requires the following:

  • VMware vSphere 6.5 or higher
  • Virtual hardware version 13 or higher
  • VMs need to be configured with EFI boot firmware

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find BIOS-Enabled VMs”

PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs

With all the news regarding the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities over the past several months, there’s been a greater focus to get VMware virtual machines to virtual hardware version 9 or higher, as noted by Andrea Mauro’s post regarding these vulnerabilities. In addition to that, several companies and organizations may be looking to enable Secure Boot, a feature first introduced with vSphere 6.5. However, in order to enable secure boot, the virtual machine needs to be configured with both EFI boot firmware AND be on virtual hardware version 13 or higher.

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs”

Git Integration with VS Code: Part 5 – Syncing with GitHub

For the fifth and final portion of my Git Integration with VS Code blog series, this post focuses on Synchronizing Content with GitHub. Previously in Part 4, we configured Visual Studio Code to establish a connection and download content from GitHub. In this post, I wanted to focus on staging, committing, and pushing content back up to GitHub. Continue reading “Git Integration with VS Code: Part 5 – Syncing with GitHub”