Achievement Unlocked! VMware vExpert 2018

Hello again, everyone! Last Friday, I hit a rather significant milestone in my career as an IT professional, as I made the cut for the VMware vExpert advocacy program for 2018! As exciting as it was to receive this news, I actually didn’t find out until about two hours after the announcements were made. Why the long delay? Well, here’s what happened…


The Announcement

I actually got a phone call from to go check my email, as the vExpert announcement emails were starting to go out. I immediately checked my corporate email, but didn’t see anything. So, I began checking my personal email accounts, and I didn’t see anything there either. I figured maybe there was a delay of some sort and I’d check back in 15-30 minutes to be safe. Well, I checked again, but I still didn’t see any announcement email in any of my accounts. Now, I was beginning to think that I honestly didn’t make it! Continue reading “Achievement Unlocked! VMware vExpert 2018”


MacOS 10.13 Graphics Issue with Early 2011 MacBook Pro

Ok. I know what you’re probably thinking… It’s now 2018, so why are you still rocking a 13″ MacBook Pro from early 2011? Well, the simple reason is that for the most part, it still does what I need it to do. It’s got a Core i7, 8GB of RAM, and an SSD drive. Another reason is that I just simply don’t have the funds to plop down on a newer model MacBook Pro. It has become clear, however, that the internal graphics card is starting to become one of its weakest components.

Earlier this year, I upgraded from MacOS Sierra 10.12.6 to High Sierra 10.13.2. Even before the update, I noticed a few websites that utilized the WebGL API said that WebGL wasn’t enabled on my browser. From what I’ve researched, it appears that WebGL was disabled in my browser because the Intel HD Graphics 3000 card isn’t supported. (See WebGL Browser Report over at

Continue reading “MacOS 10.13 Graphics Issue with Early 2011 MacBook Pro”

VS Code: Fixing Git Certificate Issues

Earlier this year, I started messing around with VS Code as a to see how it compared to the default PowerShell IDE that I’ve been using previously. It’s definitely grown on me, and I’ve been drawn to this whole concept of Git integration, not only for accessing my scripts amongst a variety of systems, but also to collaborate with my colleagues on our company’s internal GitLab site.

In trying to set up Git integration with this internal GitLab site, I kept getting a certificate error that stated: “Unable to get local issuer certificate.” Some of my colleagues didn’t seem to have this issue, and I had followed the same steps as they did during the configuration piece. We looked through a few different configurations and compared settings, but nothing was really jumping out at us.

Continue reading “VS Code: Fixing Git Certificate Issues”

New Year, New Goals

Hi there, everyone! So yes, I’m a little late in wishing everyone a happy, safe, and prosperous New Year in 2018! In addition to relaxing and enjoying time with family over the holidays, I’ve also been working on a few blog posts in the background as well. There are a few drafts in progress, and I hope to publish them in the coming days & weeks ahead.

This time of year, people often set New Years’ resolutions like eating healthier, losing weight, exercising more, and so on. For me, I think about setting a few personal goals with more definitive objectives or outcomes. So what are my personal, tech-related goals for this year?  Continue reading “New Year, New Goals”

Finding NICs That Aren’t VMXNET3

Earlier this week, someone on our team received a request to change a VMware virtual machine’s NIC from e1000 to VMXNET3. While the change was a bit manual in nature due to the Guest OS configuration changes, it got us thinking… How many other VM’s might still have e1000 NIC adapters? So, I started working on a script to find out. Continue reading “Finding NICs That Aren’t VMXNET3”

Quick Tip: ‘Bad Idea’ Trick in Google Chrome

Hello again, everyone! It seems that ever since I did the five blog posts in October for the #blogtober challenge, I practically ran out of content ideas for the month of November! However, I did think of something earlier today that I could share with you all. I wanted to take a minute to share one of my favorite tricks in the Google Chrome web browser. Now, you might be wondering, why the words “bad idea” and “Google Chrome” are in the same sentence. Well, let me explain…

When I built my VMware home lab, I just left the default, self-signed certificates that come with ESXi hosts and vCenter alone. Unfortunately, this means I usually see the certificates warning pages quite often. In Google Chrome, however, there’s a pretty neat trick to bypass this certificate page without having to use your mouse. Rather than click Advanced and then Proceed to (webpage), you can use a keyboard shortcut (actually, it’s more like a short phrase)!

When the certificate warning page is displayed, simply type the words bad idea on your keyboard, and it will bypass warning page! No mouse clicks required! Now, I’m a bit of a keyboard shortcut guy myself, so if there’s a way I can save a few mouse clicks, I usually just do that.

To show you an example of what I’m talking about, I put together a quick video to demonstrate how this works. See below:

Bad Idea Trick in Google Chrome from Doug DeFrank on Vimeo.

As always, thank you for stopping by!

Western PA VMUG Follow-Up

A quick follow-up to my experience presenting at the recent Western PA VMUG.

Hello again, everyone! First of all, I just want to take this opportunity to extend a HUGE “Thank You” to everyone who was able to come out and attend the recent Western PA VMUG! The day was packed full of information, as we got to hear a lot of great presentations about running VMware on AWS, AppDefense, vSphere APIs, and what’s new with PowerCLI. What I like most about these kinds of events is the ability to share, learn, network, meet new users, and catch up with those whom I already know.

As several folks already know, this was my very first time presenting at a VMware User Group meeting. Sure, I was a little nervous at first, but once I got up to present, things just seemed to flow. For me, it was reassuring to know that many in the audience were VMware customers who may have been in my shoes at one time, or perhaps still are. You never know. Although my presentation was mostly focused on some recent PowerCLI scripts I had developed to automate and simplify repetitive tasks, I also talked about my personal journey from avoiding scripting to actually doing it. And in my presentation, rather than just showing lines of code on a screen and explaining what the script does, I highlighted the workflow and thought process behind why I scripted it the way I did. Continue reading “Western PA VMUG Follow-Up”

PowerCLI: Enable/Disable SSH and Lockdown Mode

So, as you can probably tell from my past couple of posts, I’ve been spending a bit of time working with PowerCLI to script and automate several tasks for managing VMware environments. My most recent script combines four tasks I seem to do often when performing cluster-wide maintenance; Enabling and Disabling both SSH and Lockdown Mode. This was actually one of the scripts I discussed at the recent Western PA VMUG meeting held on October 20, 2017.

In this script, like many of my other scripts, it asks the user to enter the vCenter server to connect to, as well as the cluster to work with. Then, the user is presented with five options:

  1. Enable SSH
  2. Disable Lockdown Mode
  3. Disable SSH
  4. Enable Lockdown Mode
  5. Exit

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Enable/Disable SSH and Lockdown Mode”

My Upcoming VMUG Presentation

Hello everyone! I want to take this opportunity to let you all know that I’ll actually be presenting at the Western PA VMware User Group meeting on Friday, October 20th! We’re going to meet at Alloy 26 (100 South Commons in Pittsburgh’s North Shore) starting at 11:00 AM. Official registration and full meeting information can be found on the official VMUG page. If you’re a VMware user working or living in the Western Pennsylvania region or surrounding areas, c’mon out and use this opportunity to collaborate and network with other users I’m the VMware community! After all, events like this are put together specifically to get VMware users, administrators, engineers, etc. together to talk about their experience in using VMware products and services.

I will actually be presenting after Kyle Ruddy’s (@kruddy on Twitter) “PowerCLI and vSphere REST APIs: Your Path To Automating All the Things” session. My presentation will cover automation using PowerCLI to manage things like RDM disks, virtual standard switches, NTP settings, and more. You’ll learn how I develop the scripts to simplify repetitive tasks, but also how I use PowerCLI to perform tasks that you may not even be able to do in the GUI! Not only can scripting save time, it can also maintain consistency across within your environment! My goal is to show give you some examples and insight into how you can utilize both PowerShell and PowerCLI to augment the management of your vSphere environment. Continue reading “My Upcoming VMUG Presentation”

PowerCLI: Add/Remove NTP Servers in a VMware Cluster

I recently built out a new VMware cluster, and in doing so, needed to configure the NTP servers for each host. While this can certainly be done manually, it’s very repetitive and opens up the possibility of missing or misconfigured setting. Fortunately, there’s a way to automate that using PowerCLI!

Now, the way I wrote this script makes it a bit more interactive for the person running it. Typically, you could just define the NTP servers you want to remove, the ones to want to add, and let it run. With this script, it asks the user several questions along the way. Questions like, “What vCenter do you want to connect to?”, “What cluster do you want to scan?”, “Do you want to remove all existing NTP servers? [Y] / [N]”, and so on. There’s also validation included on the responses to the Y/N questions. And at the very end of the script, it checks the NTP services on each host in the cluster. If the NTP service is already running, it will restart the service. If it’s not running, it will start the service. All automatically. Continue reading “PowerCLI: Add/Remove NTP Servers in a VMware Cluster”