Announcing the General Availability of VMware vSphere 7.0 U3c

Update as of March 31, 2022: VMware has since released vSphere 7.0 U3d which replaces the 7.0 U3c release. It also appears that the 7.0 U3c release is no longer available in certain online repos, as well.

As of January 27, 2022, VMware has officially released vSphere version 7.0 U3c, and this particular release resolves a number of issues that were identified in previous U3 versions. In addition, the Apache log4j components have also been updated to version 2.17 to resolve both CVE-2021-44228 and CVE-2021-45046.

Please be sure to read the release notes carefully and work with your VMware TAM or account team, as upgrade guidance can vary based on the release you’re upgrading from. If you’re upgrading from version 6.5, 6.7, 7.0 GA, or 7.0 U1 to 7.0 U3c, this should be pretty straightforward; Upgrade vCenter Server first, and then upgrade your hosts.

However, if you’re upgrading from 7.0 U2c, 7.0 U2d, or prior releases of 7.0 U3, please read through the release notes and KB 87528 in thorough detail before upgrading. As mentioned in the release notes, there’s now a pre-check script called vSphere_upgrade_assessment.py that should be used to determine if there are any ESXi hosts that require remediation before upgrading the vCenter Server.

In short, the reason behind this has to do with an Intel i40en (or i40enu) driver that was renamed between releases. In some cases, both drivers could exist on the same ESXi hosts, and this could lead to network communication errors. The aforementioned script checks to see if duplicate versions of this driver exist on the hosts. If the driver is found, it’s likely that the hosts will need to be upgraded before you can upgrade the vCenter Server. Also note that the script isn’t able to confirm or check hosts that may be in a disconnected or powered off state, so it’s best to ensure that everything is online and accessible when running this script.

vCenter Server 7.0 U3c | Build 19234570

Release notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/rn/vsphere-vcenter-server-70u3c-release-notes.html
Documentation: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/index.html
Download: https://customerconnect.vmware.com/web/vmware/downloads/info/slug/datacenter_cloud_infrastructure/vmware_vsphere/7_0

ESXi 7.0 U3c | Build 19193900

Release Notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/rn/vsphere-esxi-70u3c-release-notes.html

Other Blogs and KBs related to the vSphere 7.0 U3c release announcement

Announcing Availability of vSphere 7.0 U3c (blog post):
https://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2022/01/announcing-availability-of-vsphere-7-update-3c.html
vSphere 7 Update 3 – What’s New (blog post):
https://core.vmware.com/blog/vsphere-7-update-3-whats-new
Using the vSphere_upgrade_assessment.py script | VMware KB 87258: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/87258
Important list of Knowledge base articles identified for vSphere 7.0 U3c release | VMware KB 87327: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/87327

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vRealize Suite 8.6.2 Updates

With the onslaught of log4j updates that have been coming out since mid-December 2021, many VMware customers have been anxiously awaiting product updates and workarounds for the vRealize Suite of products.

As of January 18, 2022, all of the products that make up the vRealize Suite are now available at version 8.6.2. Or, in the case of vRealize Network Insight (vRNI), version 6.5.

vRealize Lifecycle Manager (vRLCM) 8.6.2

In version 8.6.1 that was released on January 14, 2022, the log4j components have been updated to version 2.17 to resolve CVE-2021-44228 and CVE-2021-45046. The new 8.6.2 release of vRLCM (January 19, 2022) adds support for vRA 8.6.2, vRA SaltStack Config 8.6.2, vRLI 8.6.2, vROps 8.6.2, vIDM 3.3.6, as well as vRNI 6.5.

Release notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vRealize-Suite-Lifecycle-Manager/8.6/rn/VMware-vRealize-Suite-Lifecycle-Manager-862-Release-Notes.html
What’s New in vRLCM 8.6? (blog post): https://blogs.vmware.com/management/2021/10/whats-new-in-vrealize-suite-lifecycle-manager-8-6.html
Documentation: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vRealize-Suite-Lifecycle-Manager/8.6/com.vmware.vrsuite.lcm.8.6.doc/GUID-5E1CB756-CE86-430D-89C0-DE3831C33738.html
Download: https://customerconnect.vmware.com/downloads/details?downloadGroup=VRSLCM-862&productId=938&rPId=82496

vRealize Automation (vRA) 8.6.2

In the new 8.6.2 release of vRealize Automation and vRealize Orchestrator, the log4j components have been updated to version 2.17 to address both CVE-2021-44228 and CVE-2021-45046.

Release notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Automation/8.6.2/rn/vmware-vrealize-automation-862-release-notes/index.html
What’s New in vRealize Automation, OCT 2021 (blog post): https://blogs.vmware.com/management/2021/10/whats-new-with-vrealize-automation-october-2021.html
Documentation: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Automation/index.html
Download: https://customerconnect.vmware.com/downloads/info/slug/infrastructure_operations_management/vmware_vrealize_automation/8_6

vRealize Operations (vROps) 8.6.2

In this new 8.6.2 release of vRealize Operations, the log4j components have been updated to version 2.16 to address both CVE-2021-44228 and CVE-2021-45046. In addition to log4j, there were other security and product improvements in this release, as well. See VMware KB 87154 for more information.

[Update as of 26-JAN-2022]: I just learned that there’s a vROps 8.6 Hot Fix 1 that will update the log4j components to version 2.17. There are also a few other issues that are resolved in this hot fix patch. The full details of this vROps 8.6 Hot Fix 1 can be found in VMware KB 87358.

Release notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Operations/8.6.2/rn/vrealize-operations-862-release-notes/index.html
What’s New in vRealize Operations 8.6? (blog post): https://blogs.vmware.com/management/2021/10/whats-new-in-vrealize-operations-8-6.html
Documentation: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Operations/index.html
Download: https://customerconnect.vmware.com/downloads/info/slug/infrastructure_operations_management/vmware_vrealize_operations/8_6
vROps 8.6 HF1 can be obtained via the VMware Patch Portal.

vRealize Log Insight (vRLI) 8.6.2

This new 8.6.2 release of vRealize Log Insight is technically a maintenance-only release, as the log4j components have been updated to version 2.17 to address both CVE-2021-44228 and CVE-2021-45046. No other additional features were added in this specific release.

Release notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Log-Insight/8.6.2/rn/vRealize-Log-Insight-862.html
Announcing vRealize Log Insight 8.6 and Cloud: https://blogs.vmware.com/management/2021/10/announcing-vrealize-log-insight-v8-6-and-log-insight-cloud.html
Documentation: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Log-Insight/index.html
Download: https://customerconnect.vmware.com/downloads/details?downloadGroup=VRLI-862&productId=1204

vRealize Network Insight (vRNI) 6.5

The new release of vRealize Network Insight 6.5 not only updates the log4j components to version 2.17, but also adds several new features and capabilities. Some of these features include added support for monitoring and troubleshooting NSX Advanced Load Balancer, support for Cisco ACI, support for Check Point Firewall, and much more. Be sure to visit the release notes for the full list of capabilities and enhancements.

Release notes: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vRealize-Network-Insight/6.5/rn/vmware-vrealize-network-insight-65-release-notes/index.html
Announcing vRealize Network Insight 6.5 and Cloud: https://blogs.vmware.com/management/2022/01/announcing-vmware-vrealize-network-insight-6-5-and-cloud.html
Documentation: https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vRealize-Network-Insight/index.html
Download: https://customerconnect.vmware.com/downloads/info/slug/infrastructure_operations_management/vmware_vrealize_network_insight/6_x

As always, I hope you found this content useful and thanks for stopping by!

Personal Goals for 2022

Goals have been updated as of July 27, 2022.

It’s been quite some time (too long, in fact) since I’ve published anything to my personal blog. I remember thinking back in late 2019 that with my new TAM role at VMware, I was going to have the additional time needed to work on creating new content for the #vCommunity, both on this blog and over on my YouTube channel, as well. Unfortunately, I haven’t been very disciplined in that regard, as I’ve had maybe one or two blog posts since then. I also see that my last “Personal Goals” blog post was back from 2019.

With this being the start of a new year, however, I really want to try and get back into creating more content for 2022. My hope is that putting this post out into the world, I’ll hold myself more accountable by sticking with it. Here are some of my other personal goals for this coming year:

✅ Maintain VCP-DCV Certification for 2022 [Completed]

✅ Maintain vExpert status for 2022 [Completed]

✅ Present at another local VMUG meeting [Completed]

⚪️ Create and publish at least 10-20 (or more) new blog posts in 2022

⚪️ Create and publish at least five new YouTube videos

⚪️ Participate in Blogtober, where bloggers create five new blog posts in the month of October

⚪️ Reach 40 hours of community service

At the time this post was published, the applications for the VMware vExpert program are currently open through 28-JAN-2022. If you have questions about the program, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me or other vExperts in the community for help. I also encourage anyone who’s currently a vExpert to get their applications in or updated before the deadline. (Even if you’ve not been able to contribute much to the community this year).

I’ll be sure to check back and update this post throughout the year. As always, I appreciate you reading and stopping by!

Cisco UCS Log Fullness due to ECC Memory Errors

Greetings, everyone! I recently had a customer who was running into an issue where they were seeing the Cisco UCS System Event Log (SEL) fullness being reported within vCenter Server.

Upon looking at the host’s SEL Logs tab in UCS Manager, we could see that the SEL had filled up due to a significant number of ECC errors on a particular set of DIMMs. Typically, we could just clear the SEL and move on, but I’ve found that following these steps can not only clear the SEL, but may reset the ECC memory error state to help determine if a DIMM truly is flaky.

  1. Open your SSH client of choice and connect to the Cisco UCS Manager.


  2. Log in to UCS Manager. In this particular environment, the customer had to logon using their domain credentials in this format:
    ucs-DOMAIN\USERID


  3. Run these set of commands to connect to the particular blade (if applicable), reset the memory errors, and clear the SEL.

    In this example, connect to Chassis #3, Blade #2:
    scope server 3/2

    Then, reset all ECC memory errors being reported in the SEL:
    reset-all-memory-errors

    Commit the changes to UCS manager:
    commit-buffer

    The next step is to reset or clear the SEL:
    clear sel

    Again, commit the changes to UCS Manager:
    commit-buffer

  4. I believe the last step is optional, but in my experience, it didn’t hurt. Reset the CIMC, just to be safe.
    reset

    As usual, commit the changes:
    commit-buffer

    Doing so will drop any connection to the CIMC for that server (including the SSH session that was established earlier in this post).


  5. Ping or try to connect to the CIMC address after a few minutes to ensure connectivity and remote management.

And that’s pretty much all there is to it! Hopefully you found this post helpful. As always, thanks for stopping by!

VMware vForum Online 2019

If you weren’t able to make it to VMworld US earlier this year, be sure to mark your calendars for Wednesday, October 16th for VMware vForum Online 2019.

What is vForum Online?

VMware vForum Online is a like a mini-VMworld, except that it’s 100% online and doesn’t require all the travel (or travel planning). The day starts with an opening keynote by VMware’s CEO Pat Gelsinger on ‘Tech in the Age of Any.’ Afterwards, there are over thirty (30) breakout sessions to choose from that focus on these three categories: Accelerating Your Cloud Journey, Transforming Networking & Security, and Empowering the Digital Workspace. In addition to the breakout sessions, there are opportunities to chat with fellow VMware experts or choose from a number of related Hands-On Labs. The full agenda can be found here.

My Personal Experience

When it comes to vForum Online, I like to block off my day as if I were heading to a training or other conference event. I set my out of office for the day and find a quiet spot where I can truly attend the online breakout sessions with very little distractions.

Even though I attended VMworld earlier this year, there is A LOT of activity that can pull you away from attending the breakout sessions live and in-person. Sure, they’re recorded, but I find it’s even harder to commit the necessary time to sit down and truly catch up on the sessions I missed or wanted to see. Enter vForum Online.

Although the breakout sessions are streamed virtually, there are still opportunities to ask questions to the moderators and/or presenters. If there isn’t a breakout session that interests you for a particular time slot, head over to the Hands-on Labs and take a test drive of a technology you’ve been meaning to try or learn.

There’s plenty of great content to choose from, too. It’s not all just about Kubernetes, containers, and cloudy things. In looking at the agenda, there are several breakout sessions (and labs) covering vSAN, NSX, vROps, Horizon, Workspace One, Security, and Hyper-converged Infrastructure (HCI).

How Can I Attend?

That’s easy! Mark your calendars for Wednesday, October 16th from 12:00 – 6:00 EDT (UTC -4) and be sure to register using the link below! Even if you can’t make it for the entire day, at least register and attend the one or two breakout sessions that interest you the most. I look forward to seeing you there!

Register here for VMworld vForum Online 2019!

The Times They Are A Changin’

As the Bob Dylan famously recorded back in the early 1960’s, “The Times They Are A Changin’,” and that song has been on replay in my mind over the last several weeks. Personally, the month of August has been an incredible roller coaster of emotions, with several highs, a few lows, and a LOT of nervous moments in between. Let me explain…

The past several weeks have been incredibly busy and quite challenging for me, personally. I’ve been planning and executing a vSphere 6.7 upgrade at work, finalized plans for and hosted the August Pittsburgh VMUG meeting, and I had been finalizing my presentation and other conference activities for VMworld 2019 US. During the first two weekends in August, my wife and I spent the majority of our time refinishing the staircase in our house, as that was planned before all of the other activities hit.

Continue reading “The Times They Are A Changin’”

PowerCLI: Find Host Profiles and Versions in vCenter

As part of our planned upgrade to vSphere 6.7, we needed the ability to quickly scan the various vCenter Servers for host profiles that may be configured for version 5.5 or older. According to the vSphere 6.7 Release Notes, if these older host profiles are found, the vCenter pre-upgrade check will fail.

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find Host Profiles and Versions in vCenter”

Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 1 – Installing PowerShell and VMware PowerCLI

Ever since I wrote my blog series Git Integration with VS Code, I’ve been wanting to do a similar series of posts for those of us who primarily run MacOS. While a lot of the similar concepts from that series apply, I still wanted to go through the process step-by-step for those who may be completely new to this concept.

As a VMware administrator, I want the ability to write or update my PowerCLI scripts on GitHub from whatever system I have with me. Sometimes it may be my corporate-issued Windows device, and other times it might be my personal MacBook Pro. Regardless, I want to be able to synchronize my work on both systems and platforms. Now that both Microsoft PowerShell and Visual Studio Code are available on both platforms, I can work on either platform at any time and pick right up where I may have left off.

Continue reading “Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 1 – Installing PowerShell and VMware PowerCLI”