I’m Officially a Pittsburgh VMUG Leader!

Hey everyone! I’ll be kicking off the start of 2019 with some exciting news! I am now officially the newest member of the Pittsburgh VMUG Leadership Team! Though I’m technically the rookie of the group, I’ll be helping the other leaders plan meetings, find venues, coordinate food and drink, find presenters, find sponsors, and of course, set the meeting dates (among other things). I know I’ll need quite a bit of guidance at first, but I also know I have a great team that’s here to help!

So why did I want to become a VMUG Leader? Years ago, when I first started coming to these meetings, I was just as an attendee looking to learn what I could from others. Over time, I kept seeing familiar faces and began making friends. Then in October 2017, I was finally convinced to give a community presentation about how I learned PowerCLI. That changed everything! After that talk, I wanted to:

  • Get even more involved in the vCommunity
  • Share even more knowledge and experiences with others
  • Help others overcome fear presenting in front of others
  • Help others grow and excel in their careers
  • Attend other VMUGs outside of my region to learn more and meet others
  • And of course, continue learning

Continue reading “I’m Officially a Pittsburgh VMUG Leader!”

PowerCLI: Find VMs Based on Virtual Hardware Version

Hello again, everyone! For my fifth post for this year’s #BlogtoberTech challenge, I decided to share a script I recently wrote that seeks out virtual machines in a vSphere environment based on a specific virtual hardware version. This sort of ties in with the BIOS and UEFI scripts I wrote earlier in the year to seek out VMs that may still be open to the Spectre/Meltdown vulnerabilities (virtual hardware version 8 or older). Or perhaps someone wants to seek out VMs that may be good candidates to enable Secure Boot (virtual hardware 13 or newer with EFI boot firmware configured).

In the initial version of this script, I ask the user to pick the vCenter to connect to, the datacenter object to scan, and then the virtual hardware version to seek out. If VMs of virtual hardware are found, the user has the option of exporting the results to a CSV file. Otherwise, a dialog box will appear (via Out-GridView) that shows the results of the can. If, however, no VMs with a specified virtual hardware version are found, it will simply let the user know that “No VMs with virtual hardware were found.”

As usual, the latest version of this script can be found over on my GitHub page, but here’s the script as it was written at the time of this post:

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find VMs Based on Virtual Hardware Version”

PowerCLI: Find BIOS-Enabled VMs

This script is an idea that spun off of my previous post, PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs. If you’re preparing to enable Secure Boot in a VMware environment, it may be helpful to identify the VMs that cannot be upgraded. As you might recall, enabling secure boot requires the following:

  • VMware vSphere 6.5 or higher
  • Virtual hardware version 13 or higher
  • VMs need to be configured with EFI boot firmware

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find BIOS-Enabled VMs”

PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs

With all the news regarding the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities over the past several months, there’s been a greater focus to get VMware virtual machines to virtual hardware version 9 or higher, as noted by Andrea Mauro’s post regarding these vulnerabilities. In addition to that, several companies and organizations may be looking to enable Secure Boot, a feature first introduced with vSphere 6.5. However, in order to enable secure boot, the virtual machine needs to be configured with both EFI boot firmware AND be on virtual hardware version 13 or higher.

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs”