Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 3 – Configuring Git and VS Code

In my previous post, I discussed how to install both Git and Microsoft Visual Studio Code on MacOS. This is the third and final part of my three-part blog series on integrating Git with VS Code for MacOS. In this post, I’ll cover how to configure Git and Microsoft Visual Studio Code to work together to synchronize with GitHub.

Git with VS Code for MacOS blog series:

Continue reading “Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 3 – Configuring Git and VS Code”
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Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 2 – Installing Git and VS Code

In my previous post, I discussed how to install Microsoft PowerShell and VMware PowerCLI on MacOS. This is the second part of my three-part blog series on configuring Git with VS Code for MacOS. In this post, I’ll cover how to download and install both Git and Microsoft Visual Studio Code.

Git with VS Code for MacOS:

Continue reading “Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 2 – Installing Git and VS Code”

Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 1 – Installing PowerShell and VMware PowerCLI

Ever since I wrote my blog series Git Integration with VS Code, I’ve been wanting to do a similar series of posts for those of us who primarily run MacOS. While a lot of the similar concepts from that series apply, I still wanted to go through the process step-by-step for those who may be completely new to this concept.

As a VMware administrator, I want the ability to write or update my PowerCLI scripts on GitHub from whatever system I have with me. Sometimes it may be my corporate-issued Windows device, and other times it might be my personal MacBook Pro. Regardless, I want to be able to synchronize my work on both systems and platforms. Now that both Microsoft PowerShell and Visual Studio Code are available on both platforms, I can work on either platform at any time and pick right up where I may have left off.

Continue reading “Git with VS Code for Mac: Part 1 – Installing PowerShell and VMware PowerCLI”

PowerCLI: Find BIOS-Enabled VMs

This script is an idea that spun off of my previous post, PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs. If you’re preparing to enable Secure Boot in a VMware environment, it may be helpful to identify the VMs that cannot be upgraded. As you might recall, enabling secure boot requires the following:

  • VMware vSphere 6.5 or higher
  • Virtual hardware version 13 or higher
  • VMs need to be configured with EFI boot firmware

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find BIOS-Enabled VMs”

PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs

With all the news regarding the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities over the past several months, there’s been a greater focus to get VMware virtual machines to virtual hardware version 9 or higher, as noted by Andrea Mauro’s post regarding these vulnerabilities. In addition to that, several companies and organizations may be looking to enable Secure Boot, a feature first introduced with vSphere 6.5. However, in order to enable secure boot, the virtual machine needs to be configured with both EFI boot firmware AND be on virtual hardware version 13 or higher.

Continue reading “PowerCLI: Find UEFI-Enabled VMs”

Git Integration with VS Code: Part 5 – Syncing with GitHub

For the fifth and final portion of my Git Integration with VS Code blog series, this post focuses on Synchronizing Content with GitHub. Previously in Part 4, we configured Visual Studio Code to establish a connection and download content from GitHub. In this post, I wanted to focus on staging, committing, and pushing content back up to GitHub. Continue reading “Git Integration with VS Code: Part 5 – Syncing with GitHub”

Git Integration with VS Code: Part 4 – Configuring Visual Studio Code

Now that PowerShell has been upgraded, and we installed both Git and VS Code, let’s go ahead and configure our environment for synchronization with GitHub. For me, this part was really the meat and potatoes of getting VS Code to integrate with Git and GitHub.

Installing the PowerShell Module

Now that VS Code is installed, let’s install the PowerShell Module so that it can properly understand PowerShell scripts and *.ps1 files.

Continue reading “Git Integration with VS Code: Part 4 – Configuring Visual Studio Code”

Git Integration with VS Code: Part 3 – Installing Visual Studio Code

This blog post picks up where Part 2 – Installing PowerCLI and Git left off. Now that we have some momentum going with this Git Integration with VS Code blog series, let’s keep it going with Part 3 – Installing Visual Studio Code! Continue reading “Git Integration with VS Code: Part 3 – Installing Visual Studio Code”

Git Integration with VS Code: Part 2 – Installing PowerCLI and Git

In case you missed it, this blog post picks up where Part 1 – Upgrading PowerShell left off. In continuing on with the Git Integration with VS Code blog series, I now present Part 2 – Installing PowerCLI and Git!

NOTE: This process assumes a Windows-based installation, and for the Git install, most of the options were left to defaults unless otherwise noted. Continue reading “Git Integration with VS Code: Part 2 – Installing PowerCLI and Git”

Git Integration with VS Code: Part 1 – Upgrading PowerShell

So, I’ve been wanting to do this blog series for quite some time, and I’ve been working to put all of the various bits together. When I first started writing scripts for PowerCLI, I would simply write them using either the native Windows PowerShell ISE or some other text editor like Notepad++. It was fine for a while, but I soon began running into issues with version control. Before I knew it, I quickly ended up with a multitude of files in a folder. Things like script-draft.ps1, script-edited.ps1, script-edit2.ps1, script-working.ps1, script-final.ps1, script-FINAL-20180311.ps1, etc. It quickly got to the point where I didn’t know which files had the latest changes to them, or which ones had the newest feature I  implemented (or was trying to implement). Does any of this sound familiar?

At a recent Western PA VMUG meeting, I was introduced to this new product (to me, at least) called Visual Studio Code. Sure, it was another place to work on developing and even running PowerShell and PowerCLI scripts, but I had no idea how about the concept of version control or Git integration that lied within. All of that stuff was completely foreign to me, but sounded interesting. And, with the help of the #vCommunity and some of my own research, I finally got to a point where I understood how I could integrate my VS Code editor with my online GitHub account, and keep them in sync across multiple devices.

Continue reading “Git Integration with VS Code: Part 1 – Upgrading PowerShell”